Galloway essays on algorithmic culture

Michael Taussig Kamala Visweswaran " Upper-division undergraduates and above. Gleach, Choice "Orin Starn [et. Beyond a uniquely enlightening discussion of the multiple faces of the field at present, it envisages the rich paths the discipline might take in the era of radical climate change and planet-wide social and cultural dislocations.

Galloway essays on algorithmic culture

About this product Synopsis The Exploit" is that rare thing: It cuts through the nonsense about how 'free' and 'democratic' networks supposedly are, and it offers a rich analysis of how network protocols create a new kind of control.

Essential reading for all theorists, artists, activists, techheads, and hackers of the Net. McKenzie Wark, author of A Hacker Manifesto" The network has become the core organizational structure for postmodern politics, culture, and life, replacing the modern era s hierarchical systems.

From peer-to-peer file sharing and massive multiplayer online games to contagion vectors of digital or biological viruses and global affiliations of terrorist organizations, the network form has become so invasive that nearly every aspect of contemporary society can be located within it.

Borrowing their title from the hacker term for a program that takes advantage of a flaw in a network system, Alexander R. Galloway and Eugene Thacker challenge the widespread assumption that networks are inherently egalitarian.

Wednesday, August 04, 2010

Instead, they contend that there exist new modes of control entirely native to networks, modes that are at once highly centralized and dispersed, corporate and subversive.

In this provocative book-length essay, Galloway and Thacker argue that a whole new topology must be invented to resist and reshape the network form, one that is as asymmetrical in relationship to networks as the network is in relation to hierarchy.

Galloway is associate professor of culture and communications at New York University and the author of Gaming: Essays on Algorithmic Culture" Minnesota, and Protocol: How Control Exists after Decentralization.

Galloway essays on algorithmic culture

Biotechnology, Politics, and Culture. From peer-to-peer file sharing andmassive multiplayer online games to contagion vectors of digital or biological viruses and global affiliations of terrorist organizations, the network form has become so invasive that nearly every aspect of contemporary society can be located within it.

Essays on Algorithmic Culture Minnesota, and Protocol:ALEXANDER GALLOWAY in Gaming: Essays on Algorithmic Culture argues that play “is a symbolic action for larger issues in culture” (16) and that video games “render social realities into playable form” (17).

Alexander R. Galloway is an author and programmer.

A free-thinking sceptic

He is a founding member of the software collective RSG and creator of the data surveillance engine Carnivore. Galloway is the author of Protocol: How Control Exists After Decentralization (MIT, ), Gaming: Essays on Algorithmic Culture (Minnesota, ), and a book coauthored with Eugene.

Video games have been a central feature of the cultural landscape for over twenty years and now rival older media like movies, television, and music in popularity and cultural influence. Gaming Essays on Algorithmic Culture Alexander R. Galloway Electronic Mediations, Volume 18 University of Minnesota Press Minneapolis London.

Galloway is the author of Protocol: How Control Essays on Algorithmic Culture (Minnesota, ), and a new book co-authored with Eugene Thacker called The Exploit: A Theory of Networks (Minnesota, ).

Alexander Galloway is a professor of media, culture, and communication at NYU currently.

Galloway essays on algorithmic culture

His background is very interdisciplinary, having expertise in writing as well as computer programming. To that end, his philosophies on art, gaming, film, technology, mediation theory, etc. are .

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